How to Display Multiple Time Zones in the Microsoft Outlook Calendar

Microsoft Outlook Tips & Tricks
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Do you work in an organization with offices across the country or around the world? Or maybe you’re meeting with clients or partners in other time zones. Are you wasting time doing “time zone math” to determine the correct time in another location?

multiple round clocks to show different time zones

If you are often managing meetings and appointments with people in different locations, it can be helpful to show more than one time zone in your Outlook calendar.

Follow the easy steps below or watch this short video:

How to Show More Than One Time Zone in Outlook

Try these options to display up to 3 time zones in your calendar:

  1. Change the display of your Outlook Calendar to the Day, Work Week, or Week view. Then, right-click on the vertical time zone area to the left of the calendar and pick Change Time Zone.
    -OR-
    From any calendar view, pick the View tab, select Time Scale, and click Change Time Zone.
    -OR-
    Choose File > Options and move to the Calendar tab.
  2. Next, click the Time zones section. Then add a label for your local time zone, for instance, CT for Central Time. Acronyms or short labels are recommended, as longer labels will be truncated.
  3. Then, select the second time zone you want to display and add a label.
  4. Add and label a third time zone as needed.
  5. Pick Swap Time Zones if you want to change the display order of your time zones.
  6. Choose OK to finish.

Each of the time zones will now display in many of the various views of your calendar. With the Month calendar view, the default time display is based on your primary time zone.

With this handy Outlook customization, you can now stop doing “time zone math” when you set up a meeting or appointment.

To be more productive with Microsoft Outlook, check out these additional shortcuts, tips and techniques at TheSoftwarePro.com/Outlook.

© Dawn Bjork, MCT, MOSM, CSP®, The Software Pro®
Microsoft Certified Trainer, Productivity Speaker, Certified Speaking Professional

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